Category: Sovereignty Rights

No, ‘systemic racism’ is not why so many black kids are in foster care

Explaining her plan to improve foster care if elected mayor, Kathryn Garcia said she would begin with “rooting out systemic racism.” She’s hardly alone: It’s hard to throw a rock without hitting an official who thinks racism is one of the biggest problems plaguing the system. Yet the data suggest something else accounts for the disproportionate number of black kids in foster care.

Even pros get it wrong: Earlier this year, the city’s Administration for Children’s Services commissioner, David Hansell, explained: “We are now taking more aggressive and comprehensive action than ever before . . . to combat systemic racism in the child-welfare system ” because, he says, “black and brown families [are] overrepresented.”

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Censoring the censors? Florida’s anti-censorship law

This issue can be viewed as a contest between rival goods: the good of free speech for political discourse and democratic government, and the good of avoiding what, in the phrases of the CCIA suit, is “harmful, offensive, or unlawful.” And the unfortunate thing is that the parties to the conflict have little or no agreement as to exactly what these rival goods are.

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Muslim women are using Sharia to push for gender equality

Sharia is often portrayed as barbaric and particularly regressive in terms of women’s rights. Citing Sharia, lawmakers in some Muslim-majority countries have punished theft with amputation, and sex outside of marriage with stoning. Women have been also forced to stay in abusive marriages and flogged for defying Sharia because they were wearing trousers.

Commonly translated as Islamic law, Sharia is a broad set of ethical principles found in the Quran, Islam’s holy book, and in the teachings and actions of the Prophet Muhammad. It is not a strict legal code, leaving it open to varying interpretations by governments and religious leaders.Sharia is often portrayed as barbaric and particularly regressive in terms of women’s rights. Citing Sharia, lawmakers in some Muslim-majority countries have punished theft with amputation, and sex outside of marriage with stoning. Women have been also forced to stay in abusive marriages and flogged for defying Sharia because they were wearing trousers.

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Another Prestigious School Pummeled by Critical Race Theory

Regis opens a Pandora’s Box when it pledges to ensure that the Regis culture is “free from any racial or other bias, either implicit or explicit” in its July 8th missive to alumni. Pledging to eliminate IMPLICIT bias gives the CRT advocates control over all aspects of life at Regis, from admissions to curriculum, pedagogy, teacher training, grading, and discipline. All objective standards become subjective, and decisions are based on emotion rather than reason. From the CRT perspective, you cannot defend yourself against a charge of implicit racism, because the feelings of the accuser are given greater weight than an objective view of what actually transpired. From the CRT perspective, to challenge implicit racism is evidence of racism. Once CRT is given a foothold, it impacts all aspects of a school. Indeed, the job description posted by Regis mandates that the new Director of DEI be involved in every aspect of the school (admissions, curriculum, “professional development for all faculty and staff”, strategic planning, hiring, and “programming for student formation”).

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An Early Promise Broken: Inside Biden’s Reversal on Refugees

WASHINGTON — Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken was in the Oval Office, pleading with President Biden.

In the meeting, on March 3, Mr. Blinken implored the president to end Trump-era restrictions on immigration and to allow tens of thousands of desperate refugees fleeing war, poverty and natural disasters into the United States, according to several people familiar with the exchange.

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Reflections on President Oaks’ conference talk on the Constitution from the worlds of politics and lawReflections on President Oaks’ conference talk on the Constitution from the worlds of politics and law

President Oaks said the Constitution was imperfect but listed five principles he specifically said are divinely inspired: The people are the source of government. The division of delegated power between the nation and its subsidiary states. The separation of powers. The guarantees of individual rights and specific limits on government authority in the Bill of Rights. The rule of law and not individuals.

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